Archive for the ‘Libraries’ Category

Install Koha on Ubuntu — Part 6: Going Live

Koha Logo

Warning: this tutorial was developed in 2008, and is for versions of Koha and Ubuntu that are now considered quite old. If you want to install the current version of Koha on Ubuntu, please visit Koha on Ubuntu at the Koha Community wiki.

This is part 6 of 6 in a tutorial series on installing Koha 3.0 on Ubuntu 8.10.

So far we’ve installed and configured Linux, laid the groundwork for Koha, installed and configured Koha, and played around with it a little.

If you’re considering the next step—using Koha for actual library holdings and actual patrons—this final article is for you. Read more…

Install Koha on Ubuntu — Part 5: Testing

Warning: this tutorial was developed in 2008, and is for versions of Koha and Ubuntu that are now considered quite old. If you want to install the current version of Koha on Ubuntu, please visit Koha on Ubuntu at the Koha Community wiki.

This is part 5 of 6 in a tutorial series on installing Koha 3.0 on Ubuntu 8.10.

In the preceding articles we installed the groundwork for Koha and then installed Koha itself.

But so far you haven’t actually used (or even seen) your new Koha system. This article will let you start playing with it. Read more…

Install Koha on Ubuntu — Part 4: Koha

Koha Logo

Warning: this tutorial was developed in 2008, and is for versions of Koha and Ubuntu that are now considered quite old. If you want to install the current version of Koha on Ubuntu, please visit Koha on Ubuntu at the Koha Community wiki.

This is part 4 of 6 in a tutorial series on installing Koha 3.0 on Ubuntu 8.10.

The preceding articles have laid the groundwork by installing and configuring Linux, and then by installing all the underlying software that Koha requires.

This article covers—at last!—the installation of Koha itself. Read more…

Install Koha on Ubuntu — Part 3: Koha Prerequisites

Koha Logo

Warning: this tutorial was developed in 2008, and is for versions of Koha and Ubuntu that are now considered quite old. If you want to install the current version of Koha on Ubuntu, please visit Koha on Ubuntu at the Koha Community wiki.

This is part 3 of 6 in a tutorial series on installing Koha 3.0 on Ubuntu 8.10.

This article covers installing a wide variety of underlying software packages that Koha requires. These modules are the foundation upon which Koha is built. You’ll also download the actual Koha software so you can install it in the next article. Read more…

Install Koha on Ubuntu — Part 2: Preparing Linux

Koha Logo

Warning: this tutorial was developed in 2008, and is for versions of Koha and Ubuntu that are now considered quite old. If you want to install the current version of Koha on Ubuntu, please visit Koha on Ubuntu at the Koha Community wiki.

This is part 2 of 6 in a tutorial series on installing Koha 3.0 on Ubuntu 8.10.

This article covers the initial setup of your Linux server before you start working with Koha itself: installing Ubuntu Linux, web server software (Apache), database server software (MySQL), and an administration utility (Webmin). Read more…

Install Koha on Ubuntu — Part 1: Introduction

Koha

Warning: this tutorial was developed in 2008, and is for versions of Koha and Ubuntu that are now considered quite old. If you want to install the current version of Koha on Ubuntu, please visit Koha on Ubuntu at the Koha Community wiki.

This six-part series will help you to install Koha.

Specifically, this guide is for installing Koha 3.0 on Ubuntu 8.10, but it might help you with other versions of Linux and Koha too.

These articles will begin at the ground level, walking you through the installation and configuration of an Ubuntu Linux system from scratch. By the end of the series you should have a Koha system that you can use for evaluation purposes. It’ll be a basic installation using Koha’s internal search engine rather than the more scalable (and more complex) Zebra search engine. Read more…

Thin Clients in Libraries: A Brief Reflection

Picture of the book "I can make you thin"

“Thin Clients” are inexpensive computers, throwbacks to the days of computer terminals. The thin client itself has very little power, instead connecting to a powerful shared server for most of its smarts. In many situations these computers can save organizations money in purchasing, setup, and maintenance.

I recently developed a brief, 12-minute overview of “dumb” computer access devices beginning with dumb terminals, ending with thin clients, and touching on their potential application in libraries. Read more…

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